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  • A.B.Campbell 4:41 pm on June 19, 2008 Permalink
    Tags: Boeing, EADS, , GAO, Northrop Grumman,   

    The Front Porch: The Free Market Makes Three – Reprise 

    Air Force Tanker Deal Northrup Grumman EADSYesterday, the Government Accountability Office issued a recommendation that the much disputed, multi million dollar, Air Force Tanker deal awarded to Northrop Grumman EADS last February be re opened for a new round of bidding. Citing several reasons, most notably that the Air Force awarded Northrup “extra credit” for designing a plane that exceeded the requirements when in fact previous documents assert that designs exceeding those requirements would not be given special consideration.

    TSJ readers will recall from our first post on the matter, The Bruce claimed that it appeared the free market had run its course and thus the best design at the best cost had been chosen. The GAO made its recommendation based on inconsistencies within the Air Force’s decision process, and in so far as I understand, not because of free market tampering. But this does bring up an interesting point, the market may be free, but is it ever truly fair? If a company, or in this case the Air Force changes the rules of engagement mid stream, can we still have faith in the free market? If not, is this a case for regulation? And if indeed we regulate, where do we stop? It’s a slippery slope, and one I’m not sure I can ascend on my own..

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    • Don Lando 10:08 pm on June 24, 2008 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Whoever wants to use this case as an argument for more bureaucracy will find me a willing opponent.

      If anything this is a case AGAINST regulation. Just look what corrupt, idiot regulators have acheived for the taxpayers. A big expensive conflict. Had the free market been allowed to operate as it was intended we would already be bombing the crap out of some nation of little brown people.

    • The Bruce 4:42 pm on June 25, 2008 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Don Lando, thank you for talking me off the ledge.

  • The Sagamore Journal 9:17 pm on March 31, 2008 Permalink
    Tags: Boeing, , , , , , , , , , , sex education, Spitzer,   

    The Sagamore Journal: March Review 

    MARCH roared in like a lion as The Sagamore Journal began publication and rapidly expanded. Here are a few of the highs and lows from TSJ archives, March, 2008.

    The Highs:

    • Commentary:

      The Lows:

        • You, Me, and the Free Market Makes Three
          • An uninspired piece by The Bruce who wrote it with the sole intention of rubbing people the wrong way
        • Last Meals
          • A whimsical dissertation on literal meanings by Don Lando. That’s right, whimsical.
        • Commentary:

            I occasionally look up “genital warts” and “herpes” on the google picture search just for this purpose. That girl with the big ears might not be worth it after all…” -Mein Schatz, on Horny teens evaluated in new UW study

            Editors’ Picks:

                The number one problem with health care in this country is not the system but in fact the patients. The cost of prevention is almost zero in comparison to the cost of repairing decades of abuse. Ordering a diet coke with three cheeseburgers demonstrates the ignorance of the population as to the cause and effect nature of overeating and health problems. It is not in fact the thought that counts but the actual application of healthy living that makes the difference, no matter if you are skinny or fat.” -Mein Schatz, on Fat People are Crazy – New research on weight and dementia

                  The Sagamore Journal thanks The Industry Radar, WordPress, Musings of a Home Engineer, and Music for their support of this publication.
                  ~
                  The Editors, TSJ
                   
                • A.B.Campbell 8:50 pm on March 4, 2008 Permalink
                  Tags: Boeing,   

                  You, Me, and the Free Market Makes Three 

                  I am a resident of the Pacific Northwest and I am not upset that Boeing recently lost the air tanker contract. Why? Because it appears that the best machine won, and since Boeing has won every defense contract for nearly half a century, I feel that a little pressure to perform better is a good thing. This is because true free market competition, blind to other factors (like socio-political) forces business to deliver the best product at the lowest price. I like this as a taxpaying recipient of the common defense and I like this as a private citizen when I buy every day products. And while I am most certainly a patriot, what’s good for business is good for America, and what’s good for business is to adapt, and improve. And what’s good for Boeing is precisely what it got.

                   
                  • Don Lando 1:50 am on March 5, 2008 Permalink | Log in to Reply

                    I couldn’t be more in agreement with The Bruce here.

                    There’s been much to do over the Air Force’s selection of a new foreign-made aerial tanker. Loud voices denounce the traitorous free-market capitalism. Truth is, alot of the parts on Northup Grumman’s aircraft are made in areas of the US far more desperate for work than the home state of Boeing’s Pratt & Whitney engines, Connecticut.

                    So I don’t care whatsoever. That is, assuming the military is less likely to throw billions at EADS than they did at KBR (example here and in many other media outlets
                    )

                    ..but then, who knows.

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